Tag Archive - DIY

And there was much rejoicing.

fireworks 21
Photo by Flickr user ursmajor.

I’ve been away yet I’ve been right here. There have a few events happening in RL that combined with trying to keep up with multiple social networking sites I, well, let the dust start collecting here. When I was ready to start posting a few weeks back I couldn’t think of where to start. A friend simply said, “Just post something, anything, but do it to get rolling again.”. She’s right! I think I’ll share some highlights of what I’ve/we’ve been working on since I flew the coop. I’ll then repost each with more information and details! So without further ado and for your viewing pleasure I give… you pictures!

We revamped our breakfast nook last month. I really love hanging out in this space!

I made these collapsible display busts for the booth inspired by this wonderful tutorial on Design*Sponge:

I completed an intensely fun painting project recently. No really, it was incredibly therapeutic!

Michael cleaned and rewired this beautiful clock we found at thrift store.

We’ve made some great progress in the garden/back yard. We installed a shade sail/sail shade with a collapsible pole system this weekend. It’s not finished but I have this so far.

We had some water issues in the pond that had us stumped for a while but I think we’ve worked them out. This little frog has taken up permanent residence in the pond.

As well as one frisky dragonfly.

We got our new carnivorous garden started.

I showed no mercy when I ripped the nasty old carpet off the stairs last week.

That’s it for today. I’ve really missed this place. ♥

Science & Art

The first lamp arrived on Saturday. I gotta say, it’s not just a lamp, it’s a work of art. Seriously, this is the kind of stuff that makes us giddy and the thought of breaking it down and carefully restoring it to it’s former glory is very inspiring. The photos are of the lamp having just been pulled out of the box, so it’s a little dusty.

Gooseneck lamp

As we suspected from looking at the original photo, the shade and socket are brass. We aren’t sure about the neck and base just yet. The Mason’s emblem is in pretty good shape. The cord is an entertaining patch job and we would replace it with cloth covered wire if it weren’t going on the wall. Then again, we have that second lamp coming in…

Gooseneck Lamp

The socket has a porcelain insulator inside and is in wonderful condition other than needing a good cleaning and new wiring, and we’re so using it. In the second photo, Michael is trying to clean the plastic switches with GOJO to see if they’re made of Bakelite. It works the same way that using Scrubbing Bubbles in that whatever you’re using to rub the cleaner on with will turn yellowish. GOJO cleans Bakelite to a beautiful shine, and maybe I’ll be able to convince Michael to post the process of when he buffed the dial of his new Variac. His first attempt tells us no, but he’s going to try it again now that the socket unit is completely disassemlbled.

I hope this won’t take too long as I want to declare our room finished for this phase. Garden weather is upon us!

I Love You More Than All The Stars…

Michael has been wonderful at motivating me to get things finished in the bedroom. It wasn’t easy on his part but he was successful. This past weekend we built the pelmet for the one window we have in our bedroom, which is actually the FROG. A pelmet is a framework mounted above a window used to hide curtain fittings and to help retain temperature inside a room. Pelmets are also called top treatments, cornices or valances. However, they differ from other top treatments in that the pelmet is a hardened valance or a treatment built over a structure. Most people either love them or hate them, and I find myself in both camps. I love the finish they provide to a window treatment, but they can also feel rigid. We’ve made traditional looking pelmets, one in our new dining room and in our old bedroom, but this time I wanted to go in a more whimsical direction in our space.

I love Shanna Murray‘s decals, especially this one. I wanted to have it in our room so Michael can read it every morning when he opens his eyes, and my thinking was that the pelmet would be perfect place. Yup, I’m very much a romantic geek! I try to support artists whenever I can but dangit, after buying the supplies to make the pelmet base it pained me we could not justify buying the decals from her. So DIY it was!

Now, I don’t trust my handwriting these days so drawing the letters freehand was out of the question. It took a day for the ‘aha’ moment to arrive and I could set about making them. I downloaded the Markus Ink font I and put a stroke/border around the type for my cutting guides. I printed them on full sheet adhesive labels in a series of three pages. Once printed, I sat down and cut out the shapes. I find this kind of work very therapeutic. I used the scraps to cut out the stars would stick to the pelmet front and the stars for the garland were cut from the scrap poster board from the snowflake garlands I made during the holidays. We hung the pelmet and strung the garlands, once I finished sewing them.

Pelmet Montage

Fresh from the printer. | Finished cutting. | Applied to pelmet surface {all edges have been smoothed out}. | Ta-da! | Shooting stars. | Stars detail.

I’m still looking forward to buying something from Shanna down the road, particularly these!

Snowflake Garland DIY

We originally bought the snowflake punch to make placemats similar to the ones I made for Halloween, but I discovered that they didn’t quite work the same as the cats in the mats. They’re not solid shapes, they’re shapes within shapes. I could salvage this, I thought. So my next attempt was to glue the snowflakes on red poster board, only…I haven’t been able to find poster board in a shade of red or green that doesn’t make my eyes bleed. Needless to say, that was scrapped in favor of sewn placemats. I still had a pile of snowflakes begging to be used. I was reading some of my favorite blogs this weekend and saw photos of various dainty looking garlands, and thought to myself that these might look just as good.

Materials needed:
Poster board
Thread & needle
Snowflake Punch (we bought ours at Michaels)

Cut out snowflakes. I averaged around 50 per garland. Tie a snowflake at one end. Thread a large needle with the thread and work it through one hole, and then back through another. Slide the snowflake down a bit and continue. Once you’ve reached the desired length, tie off another snowflake that the end. I finished off the knot with fabric glue. It’s not necessary, just force of habit. Hang the garland and space the snowflakes.

I’m very pleased with them!



{ Images click through to larger versions }

We kept the little punched out bits and used them for paper snow, sprinkling them around one of our candle displays.

Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow!

Michael and I decided to forego the holiday shopping traffic during the weekend and hit up Michaels yesterday in search of supplies to finish decorating. One of the things we needed was fake snow, preferably the loose stuff. They sold out over the weekend and were not expecting any more for the season, so we used our coupons for what we could find and went down the road to A.C. Moore. Sure enough, they too were sold out. Heavens forbid, we thought, the Charleston area may be experiencing a snow shortage! We found the last bag of Buffalo Snow and put it in our basket. It wasn’t what we originally wanted but decided to adapt to our very limited options. We picked up a few more things that we couldn’t find at Michaels and headed to the check-out.

While we were in line Michael decided to run next door to the dollar store and try his luck. He returned in about 30 seconds. We asked our cashier if she knew possibly where to find some. She said she thought everywhere she could think of was sold out. Then she asked, “Would you like to know how to make it?”. Yes, please! She told us she had tried to demonstrate the process to another customer just minutes before but he said it was ‘too much effort’. We put our things down on the counter and headed back to the floral department where she grabbed two blocks of white styrofoam and starting rubbing them together. And right in front of our eyes it started snowing! We grabbed two blocks of styrofoam and headed back to finish our purchase.

This is the result we got from our efforts. Behind the cut are a few more photos.


We used a bin top to collect the falling particles.

Flurries!
Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow.

Finished! We thought it would look nice to have some fine powder and even some chunks in the mix. Notice the blocks have been rubbed down to almost nothing.
Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow.

I can’t believe we didn’t get her name, but thanks super awesome A.C. Moore employee! I’ll post photos of the project we made this for when it’s finished.

I KNOW YOU WANT TO SEE THE MORE SNOW IN ACTION! >>

Candy Corn Garland DIY

I just saw this on Poppytalk and had to share it. Please see this post for the tutorial!

Guest Post at Lost & Fawned

I’m very excited that my friend Lindsey of Lost & Fawned asked me to write something for Halloween. I decided to share how we made our vintage looking bat picture in the foyer. It’s a very easy and inexpensive project to finish for the weekend!

I’m looking forward to making more posts at Lost & Fawned in the future, and Lindsey make some guest appearances as well.

Thank you Lindsey!

Bon Weekend – Samhain preparations.

{ Thank you Sarah Rae! }

I’m posting this a little early as Michael and I will be out of town this weekend and it’s not very easy posting via my phone. Today’s post is focusing on our Samhain interior decorations. The main area we focused on was the dining room|foyer. Goodness, I find myself more excited than usual about the upcoming sabbat. We didn’t decorate or really take part in any festivities surrounding the sabbat last year as my fathers illness was progressing and we were still in the ‘trying to diagnose’ phase. He was hospitalized for the final time just after.

For those of you who may be unfamiliar with the term Samhain and how I sometimes interchange it with Hallwe’en, I asked Michael to write some of the history|origins of the sabbat, and how it is celebrated. I wouldn’t be surprised if more things find their way into this setting!

On October 31 we celebrate the Celtic feast of Samhain. Samhain, is Gaelic for “summer’s end,” and is the most important of the ancient Celtic feasts. During this time we honor the opposing balance of intertwining forces of existence: darkness and light, night and day, cold and heat, death and life. Our year is divided into two seasons: the light and the dark, celebrating the light at Beltane on May 1st and the dark at Samhain on October 31st. Therefore, the Feast of Samhain marks one of the two great doorways of our year. We believe that Samhain is the most important festival, since it marks the beginning of a new dark-light cycle. We observe this time as proceeding from darkness to light because we understand that in dark silence comes whisperings of new beginnings, the stirring of the seed below the ground. Whereas Beltane was welcomed in the summer light with joyous celebrations at dawn, the most magically potent time of Samhain is at night. The Eve of Samhain, is the most important part of our celebration. We will gather our best autumn harvest for a feast. We will put out food and drink fthat was special to those who have passed on with great ceremony, and we will leave windows, doors, and gates unlocked to give our ancestors free passage into our homes. We will offer personal prayers in the form of objects symbolizing our wishes or notes stating ailments to be healed will be cast into a fire. We will offer up many gifts in thanksgiving for the harvest. We carve “jack o’lanterns” and keep them at our doors to keep out unwelcome visitors from the Otherworld. We also dress in costumes in the tradition of our ancestors symbolizing the spirits of departed family returning home for the festival. For us this is a great time of contimplation as we come to recognize our own part in the eternal cycle of Life.

I generally love to decorate for the seasons|sabbats|holidays using family heirlooms, but it always feels more appropriate during this particular time of year.

Samhain tablescape
{ All images click through to larger versions }


Samhain tablescape

Samhain tablescape

Samhain tablescape

Samhain tablescape

Samhain tablescape

Samhain tablescape

The tablecloth is basic gauze and the netting we picked up at the dollar store. I’m hoping that the gauze develops picks and runs as time progresses. I want it to feel tattered. That’s my mothers wedding china, silver and crystal, and we also acquired those 1960s wheat glasses several months ago. The black place mats can be seen in greater detail here. The black box in the center held my grandfathers important papers at the house and the birds were painted by my grandmother.

The very lovely tankard – or beer stein as my mother calls it 😉 – has been in my mother’s family for multiple generations and came from England. The branches were collected in the woods behind the house and we spray painted them black. The brass candleholders were part of a cache we scored from the thrift store recently. We painted some them black but keep these untouched, as they have a lovely patina on them.

Photos of our deceased family members have been placed on the hunt board as well as a dish, bowl, and glass.

Samhain

garlandBefore

Bat garland information can be found in this post.

Chandelier

Vintage glasses

Samhain tablescape

Samhain tablescape

The hexagonal terrarium in the front was purchased last fall at the same thrift store that we’ve found so many wonderful treasures. The tri-candle holder was purchased a while back on Etsy. The Staffordshire dog is another one of our ‘old’ things.

The dish that holds the eyeballs can be seen in more detail at http://thehappyheathen.com/?p=269.

Raven

Raven

The tree in the foreground came from the DC area, I believe. My mother bought it in ’73 and I need to look on the plaque for the artist’s name. I’ve always loved this tree.

And of course some of my great loves, our Carew Rice tumblers.

Foyer scene

Bats

The black candleholder is actually brass and came from the same the thrift store we love so much, for about a dollar. We spray painted it matted black. The bowl the skull is sitting in is a Goodwill score from last week for $3.50. The black and gold tin tray has been with us for a very long time!

I downloaded the image of the bats from The Graphics Fairy and printed it. The frame came from the thrift store and the ribbon is was used to hang the photos on our memorial tree at our wedding: www.flickr.com/photos/38016153@N03/3637770059/in/set-7215

Goodness, I hope I haven’t left anything out! Happy ready and bon weekend.

Bat Garland

eta – Thanks to AT for featuring this project!

More DIY projects! This is a bat garland using the same black poster board as I used for the placemats. I used the bat template provided for the Clothespin Bats project on Martha Stewart. I also made a master tracing template from velum. After I cut out all the bats, with the help of my mother, I hot glued them to black ribbon that I had in my ribbon bin. I have a couple lengths of garland, with the first being placed in the dining room, as pictured below.

Bat garland
{ Click image to enlarge }

Fraidy cat ‘lace’ placemats.

We’re working on putting the final touches on our dining room Samhain decorations and I wanted to share the placemats we’ll use. I made these last night using some of the leftover black poster board, the MS cat punch we bought several years ago, and a regular hole punch. The last time I used the punch was while I was restoring my shoes for the wedding. This was a fairly fast, easy and fun project to do!

Fraidy cat placemats
{ Click image to enlarge }

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Page 4 of 7« First...«23456»...Last »